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Food Combining Chart

Be sure to check out the Herbal Recommendation Chart.

Download Dherbs Food Combining ChartDownload Dherbs Food Combining Chart

Food combining (the intentional pairing of certain foods) has helped millions of people resolve various health issues. By pairing the correct foods together you can over come various health issues i.e.; digestive problems, allergies, weight issues, and increase your energy levels tremendously.

Is your digestive system struggling?

Many of our digestive issues stem from the foods that we eat, and what foods we decide to eat together.

Poor digestion can cause serious health problems.

If you have frequent stomach issues, food combining (pairing the proper foods together) may help you alleviate those issues.

Starches and proteins are digested differently within our bodies. By simplifying our meals, our stomach and intestines will have an easier time processing these foods.

Many other animals, especially mammals (chimpanzees and gorillas especially) tend not to eat a variety of different types of food at the same time, as this can affect the digestion of these foods.

Most people get away with combining the wrong foods, however, if you’re prone to acid reflux, digestive discomfort, bloating after meals, heartburn and other digestive problems, you will find our food combining cart to be very beneficial.

 

Vegetables-Green Leafy

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
Beet Greens ALK All year long 2
Brussels Sprouts AC Sept-May 4
Cabbage ALK All year long 3
Caraway ALK All year long 3
Catnip ALK All year long 2 _
Celery ALK All year long 3 _
Chard ALK Dec-June 3
Chicory Greens ALK All year long 3
Chives ALK All year long 3 _
Collards ALK All year long 3 _
Cress AC All year long 3
Dandelion ALK All year long 2 _
Dulse ALK All year long 1 _
Endive ALK All year long 3
Fennel ALK All year long 3
Kale ALK All year long 3 _
Leeks ALK All year long 2 _
Lettuce (Romaine or Green) ALK All year long 2 _
Mustard Greens ALK All year long 3 _
Parsley ALK All year long 1 _
Sea Kelp ALK All year long 1 _
Spinach ALK All year long 3
Swiss Chard ALK All year long 3 _
Watercress ALK All year long 3 1/4
Do NOT combine with FRUITS and/or MELONS!
Combines good with PROTEIN and/or STARCHES
 

Vegetables-Non-Starchy

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
Turnips ALK All year long 4
Alfalfa Sprouts ALK All year long 1 _
Artichoke ALK All year long 2
Asparagus ALK Feb-June 2 _
Bamboo Shoots ALK All year long 3 _
Broccoli ALK All year long 3
Cauliflower ALK All year long 2 _
Corn (Young and Sweet) ALK All year long 3
Garlic ALK All year long 2
Green Beans (Fresh) ALK All year long 3 _
Green Peas ALK All year long 3 _
Mung Bean Sprouts ALK All year long 1 _
Mushrooms ALK All year long 2 _
Onion ALK All year long 3 _
Radish ALK All year long 3 _
Rhubarb ALK Jan-July 3
String Beans ALK All year long 3
Do NOT combine with FRUITS and/or MELONS!
Combines good with PROTEIN and/or STARCHES!
 

Vegetables - Fruit-Vegetables

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
Cucumber ALK All year long 3 _
Egg Plant ALK All year long 3 _
Okra ALK All year long 2 _
Peppers (Green, Red, Yellow Bell, etc.) ALK All year long 3 _
Summer Squash (Yellow, Zucchini, Scallop, etc.) ALK Apr-Dec 2 _
Do NOT combine with FRUITS, MELONS and/or PROTEINS!
Combines good with STARCHES!
 

Proteins - Fruit

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
Avocados ALK All year long 1 _
Coconuts ALK All year long 2 _
Olives AC All year long 1 _
SEEDS
Chia Seeds AC All year long 3
Flax Seeds AC All year long 2 _
Pumpkin Seeds AC All year long 3 _
Sesame Seeds AC All year long 3 _
Sunflower Seeds ALK All year long 3 _
NUTS
Almonds ALK All year long 2 _
Beech Nuts AC All year long 3
Brazil Nuts AC All year long 3 _
Butternuts AC All year long 3
Candle Nuts AC All year long 3 _
Cashew Nuts AC All year long 3 _
Filberts AC All year long 3
Hickory Nuts AC All year long 3 _
Macadamia Nuts AC All year long 3 _
Pecans AC All year long 2 _
Pignolia Nuts AC All year long 2 _
Pine Nuts AC All year long 3
Pinon Nuts AC All year long 3
Pistachio Nuts AC All year long 3 _
Walnuts (English and Black) AC All year long 3
LEGUMES
Lentils AC All year long 3
Peanuts AC All year long 3 _
Soybeans ALK All year long 3 _
Do NOT combine with FRUITS, MELONS, PROTEINS and/or STARCHES!
Combines good with VEGETABLES!
 

Fruits - (Acid)

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
STONE
Acerola ALK May-Aug 3
CITRUS
Grapefruit ALK All year long 2
Kumquat ALK Nov-Mar 2 _
Lemon ALK All year long 1 _
Lime ALK All year long 3
Orange ALK All year long 3
Pineapple ALK All year long 2 _
Tangerine ALK Oct-May 2
BERRY
Cranberries AC Sep-Jan 3 _
Currants AC Jun-Aug 2 _
Gooseberry ALK June & July 3 _
Logan Berry ALK May-Aug 2 _
Pomegranates ALK Sep-Dec 3 _
Strawberries ALK All year long 2 _
CORE
Sour Apples ALK All year long 3
ACID FRUIT-VEGETABLE
Tomato ALK All year long 2
Do NOT combine with SWEET FRUITS, MELONS, STARCHES, PROTEINS and/or VEGETABLES!
Combines good with SUB-ACID FRUITS!
 

Fruits (Sub-Acid)

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
CORE
Apple ALK All year long 2 _
Pears ALK All year long 2 _
STONE
Apricot ALK May-Aug 2 _
Cherries ALK May-Aug 2
Nectarines ALK May-Sep 2 _
Peach ALK May-Sep 2 _
Plum AC Jun-Oct 2 _
MELON
Mango ALK Apr-Sep 1 _
Papaya ALK All year long 1 _
Paw Paw ALK All year long 2
BERRY
Blackberry ALK May-Aug 2 _
Blueberry AC May-Sep 2
Cactus Fruit (Prickly pear, etc.) ALK Aug-Sep 2 _
Figs (Fresh) ALK Jun-Nov 2 _
Grapes ALK All year long 1 _
Guava ALK All year long 3
Huckleberry ALK May-Sep 2 _
Litchi (Lycii) ALK May & June 2
Mulberry ALK May-Aug 2
Raspberry ALK Jun-Oct 1 _
Do NOT combine with SWEET FRUITS, MELONS, STARCHES, PROTEINS, and/or VEGETABLES!
Combines good with ACID FRUITS!
 

Fruits (Sweet)

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
SWEET FRUIT
Banana ALK All year long 3
Carob AC Sep-Dec 3
Dates ALK All year long 2 _
Persimmon ALK Oct-Dec 3 _
Plantain ALK All year long 3
DRIED FRUIT
Apples ALK All year long 2 _
Apricots ALK All year long 2 _
Figs ALK All year long 2 _
Litchi (Lycii) ALK All year long 2 _
Peaches ALK All year long 2 _
Pears ALK All year long 2 _
Pineapple ALK All year long 2 _
Prunes AC All year long 3
Raisins ALK All year long 2
Warning: Do NOT eat SULFURED dried fruits, as sulfur causes allergic reactions. Do NOT eat with ACID FRUITS, SUB-ACID FRUITS, MELONS, STARCHES, PROTIENS, and/or VEGETABLES!
 

Melons

Name of Food pH Balance When in season Hours to digest
Banana Melon ALK Jul-Oct 3 _
Cantaloupe ALK May-Oct 3 _
Casaba Melon ALK Jul-Nov 3 _
Christmas Melon ALK Jul-Oct 3 _
Honey Dew Melon ALK Mar-Oct 3 _
Musk Melon ALK Jul-Oct 3 _
Nutmeg Melon ALK Jul-Oct 3 _
Persian Melon ALK Jun-Oct 3 _
Watermelon ALK Apr-Sep 2 _
Warning: Eat melons ALONE or LEAVE THEM ALONE!

Protein and carbohydrate concentrated foods

In order to breakdown the proteins that we ingest, the body utilizes acid. When we digest the protein that we receive from animal meat, a high level of hydrochloric acid is needed to properly break down the protein so that our bodies can process it properly. On the other hand, foods rich in carbohydrates require the use of the alkali within the body in order to be broken down properly. High carbohydrate foods that have been mixed with foods that are high in protein will not be digested, but will instead sit in the body fermenting, and thus producing indigestion, bloating, and/or gas. Unfortunately most of the meals that we eat are composed of both proteins and carbohydrates, thus ending in a digestive disaster. For instance many of us pair our large steaks with potatoes, and/or bread which hinders our body from digesting the meal properly, and only causes us more issues.

Most foods that are rich in protein are best digested when accompanied by a fresh green salad, or other such vegetables which are similar in content. In conjunction to this, other high protein foods such nuts and seeds work very well when paired up with fruits that are rich in acid such as oranges, pineapples blackberries, or strawberries. In addition to the acidic fruits, these high protein foods also work fairly well when paired up with sub-acid fruits such as apples, cherries, mangos, or peaches. The vitamin C in these fruits aids the digestion of the mixture, and can help the body when processing these foods for digestion.

1. Eating two concentrated proteins together
Each type of protein requires a specific character, strength and timing of digestive juice secretions. This means that no two types of concentrated protein should be consumed together as a meal. As an example, we do not recommend that you eat nuts, meat, eggs, cheese, or other any other foods rich in protein together. We also suggest that you do not eat two different types of animal protein together, which is hard to imagine if you are used to eating things such as turkey, bacon sandwich.

2. Protein and fats
Fat inhibits the secretion of the gastric juices needed to digest meat, fish, dairy, nuts, and eggs by as much as fifty percent. When high fat foods are eaten with foods rich in protein, the digestive breakdown of the fats is delayed until the gastric juices have completed breaking down the complex proteins first. This ultimately means that the fats will remain undigested in the stomach for a long period of time.

3. Acid fruits with carbohydrates
The enzyme in saliva which begins the breakdown of foods rich in starch content converts complex starch molecules into more simple sugars. In order to work, the enzyme requires that it be in a neutral or slightly alkaline state. The is typically the natural condition found in the mouth when the proper foods are being eaten. However, when foods heavy in acidic content are eaten, the action of the enzyme needed to break down the starches is halted because the state of the mouth has been altered. Thus, fruits which are are high in acidic content should not be eaten at the same time as sweet fruits or other starches. The combination of the two is what makes spaghetti, and other such dishes which combine tomatoes with starches (noodles) have that bloating effect on our body.

4. Acid fruits with protein
Oranges, tomatoes, lemons, pineapples and other acid fruits can be easily digested and produce no distress when eaten away from foods that are high in starch and/or protein content. However, when included in a meal that contains a heavy protein content, fruits which have a high acidic content seriously hamper the digestion of the proteins. This is in part what makes the typical breakfast of orange juice, bacon, eggs and toast such a digestive nightmare.

5. Starch and sugar
Eating starches which also contain sweets is not a good idea. While the food my produce more than enough saliva, the saliva contains minimal amounts of the enzymes needed to digest the starch because the sugar has turned the environment acidic. This is why fruit filled doughnuts are not good for our digestive tracts. The carbohydrates actually end up fermenting within the body due to the fact that they were not properly digested.

6. Consuming melons
Melons should not be consumed with any other foods. Watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, and the more exotic melons should always be eaten alone. Melons are meant to decompose quickly in the digestive system, which is what they will do if you do not include foods which will interfere with the process.

 
 
 

"God causes the grass to grow for the cattle and the herbs for the service of humanity." Psalm 104:14
"...and the leaf shall be for the healing of the nations." Revelation 22:2

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